Posts by The Seniors Center Blog

As President of The Seniors Center, Dan Perrin has built a grassroots movement of over 450,000 senior citizens who educate the American public and influence policy makers on issues that effect the quality of life for Americas retired people. The Seniors Center concentrates on securing the Social Security Trust Fund where it has advocated for repayment of funds diverted from Social Security into the Federal Budget. The Seniors Center is based in Washington, DC.

The Justice Department declares war on elder fraud in largest nationwide sweep ever

In 2018, the United States Justice Department launched a nationwide campaign against senior fraudsters–the largest such sweep in history.  Over 200 senior scammers–responsible for victimizing over a million Americans–have been identified and brought to justice.  Through their financial schemes alone, victims lost over half a billion dollars.

This year, the Justice Department’s sweeps were even more successful than last.  Over 260 defendants were charged with allegedly defrauding over two million Americans for over three quarters of a billion dollars.

Among other types of scams, the sweep focused specifically on identifying tech support scammers, consistently one of the most damaging scams targeting seniors.

In order to crack down on senior scammers, the Justice Department is a multi-prong attack, working with overseas governments to stop bogus foreign call centers, catching and stopping international “money mules,” and coordinating with the United States Postal Service to intercept payments sent to scammers.

In a press conference led by United States Attorney General William Barr, the Justice Department presents the results of their senior scam crack-down and explains how the government is fighting back against senior scammers.

Equifax breach settlement: check here to see if you’re eligible to file a claim

You probably recall Equifax’s massive scale data breach in 2017.  As many as 147 million Americans’ personal information, including their Social Security numbers, were exposed to cyber criminals and potential identity theft.

Following the breach, Equifax failed to alert consumers their data was vulnerable.  Breach victims had no idea their information was exposed for several months, so they didn’t know to take protective measures to prevent identity theft.

Two years later, the Federal Trade Commission has ordered Equifax to pay as much as a $700 million settlement to those affected by the data breach.

With 147 million Americans affected, YOU have most likely had your personal information exposed in the breach.

By visiting the official Equifax settlement claims website, you can check to confirm that you are one of those affected by the breach and quickly file a claim to be included in the settlement.

We suggest that if you’re affected, you file a claim right away and keep a close eye on your credit report for any suspicious activity in the future.

Old scam, new packaging: genetic testing scam offers free medical screening in exchange for your identity

Say what you will, but identity thieves are nothing if not creative.

But behind their ever-evolving scare tactics and too-good-to-be-true giveaways and opportunities hides the exact same scam: convince the victim to hand over their Social Security number and banking information.

The newest iteration of this con is making headlines across the country.  It’s occurring both by phone and in person, with scammers even having the audacity to make their pitches in local seniors centers.

It’s being called the “genetic testing” or “DNA testing” scam. Similar to the medical equipment offers we discussed last year, the genetic testing scam promises seniors Medicare-covered genetic screening to identify serious health risks.  

All you’d have to do is use their 100% free at-home DNA swab kit, package it up, and send it back to the agency along with your Medicare information, your personal information, your Social Security number, and your bank information.

…See where this is going?

The truth is this is nothing but fresh paint on a falling down house.  Preying on seniors and their health concerns, genetic testing scammers dangle the hope of preventing life-threatening illness over their victims’ heads with no intention of doing anything but stealing their identities.

This scam is springing up nationwide.  Seniors report both being contacted by phone and encountering these creeps collecting information in places seniors spend time. 

If you should also run into someone making a “free” genetic testing pitch to Medicare recipients, just follow these simple rules to avoid becoming their next victim:

  • As with all medication, medical equipment, and medical testing offers, you should only be discussing these things with your doctor.  Should you need anything of a medical nature, your trusted physician will be the one to order it or point you in the right direction.  Don’t trust anyone making you any medical offers that you or your doctor haven’t solicited.
  • DO NOT give ANYONE your Social Security number, banking information, or personal information except those that absolutely need it.  Especially if it is solicited by phone or by an unknown person or organization.
  • Protect those around you by reporting these calls and solicitations to the appropriate agency

If you receive one of these calls or are encountered by someone pitching a free genetic test to you, do not engage them.  These people are charismatic and extremely convincing.  Any attempt to argue or confront them could open a door for them to ensnare you in their scam.   Hang up the phone or walk away.  It’s not rude.  It’s not wrong.  You don’t owe any type of courtesy or conversation to someone trying to take advantage of you. 

Half of all calls to U.S. cell phones predicted to be spam in 2019

A few months ago, some team members at The Seniors Center attended a workshop inviting seniors to speak directly to Congressmen and representatives from several agencies specializing in seniors issues.

Although the workshop generally focused on federal economic policy, when opened for question-and-answer time, a large percentage of attendees’ questions had little to do with economic legislation.

Instead, they were about robocalls—specifically, what is the government planning on doing to stop the constant spam and scam calls seniors receive each day?

While Americans of all ages can attest to the frustrating increase of spam calling in the past few years, it is clear after listening to seniors themselves this is a major concern for older Americans in particular.  This is unsurprising given phone scammers often target vulnerable seniors, using tried-and-true techniques specifically designed to part retirees from their cash.  Seniors are often disproportionately affected by phone scams.

What attendees wanted to know is why the problem seems to be getting worse rather than better.   And why isn’t the federal government able (or willing) to do anything about a problem affecting every single American with a cell phone.

Data from First Union confirms the problem is indeed worsening.  They project by the end of this year, nearly half of all calls made to U.S. cell phones will be spam calls.

What we learned that day from the experts themselves is stopping the onslaught of bogus calls is much more complicated than it may seem.  Call “spoofing” combined with the fact that most of these calls originate internationally makes regulating these calls almost impossible.

While cell providers are doing what they can to identify and intercept these calls where they can, it seems for now, it’s up to cell users themselves to protect themselves.

The best thing seniors can do to defend themselves from scam callers is not give scammers the opportunity in the first place: never pick up or answer unknown calls—even if they come from a local area code.

Just picking up and answering one of these calls—even if you don’t give away any of your information—is enough to confirm to a scammer or robocaller that your number is valid and a human will pick up the phone.  This can result in a huge uptick in spam calls.

Allow unknown callers to go to voicemail.  Friends, family, and legitimate business callers will have no problem leaving a message should they really need to get in touch.

And under no circumstances give any unknown caller any of your personal information.  If you are unsure if a caller is legitimate or not, hang up and try to locate their place of business online.  If you can locate a contact number for the caller’s business online, call back using that number and ask if a representative there has called or needs to get in touch with you.

Senior scams contributing to suicide among older adults

According to the Centers for Disease Control, suicide rates among the elderly have increased by over 30% since 1999.

Some of the biggest increases in suicide rates have occurred in the Midwest and Northeast, in states like Kansas, the Dakotas, Minnesota, Vermont and New Hampshire.

While the CDC states there is no definitive cause for these increases, they have identified a pattern of stressors and life events that contribute heavily to many of these cases. Several of these stressors have to do with economic and housing instability, immediate crises, legal trouble, relationship problems, and health challenges.

These are problems that impact everyone, but the implications for seniors are often far greater than with other age groups.  Seniors are extremely vulnerable in all of these areas, and in many cases, they are far less likely to bounce back from a major emotional or financial blow.

These are exactly the types of blows scammers are delivering to seniors each and every day.

The same anxieties the CDC identifies as major factors in the growing amount of self-harm and suicide cases in the United States are the tools scammers use to hook and completely destroy their victims.

They create relationship stress with dating scams.  They create fake family crises with grandparent scams.  They threaten legal action with IRS tax scams.  They promise miracle cures and treatments through medical scams.  And ultimately, they drain the savings of the financially vulnerable and create very real economic hardship for people who do not have the means to replace what was lost.

In the end, the fear, anxiety, and guilt victims feel when they realize what has happened is sometimes too much to bear.  In some cases, the victims of senior scams are being driven to death.

The consequences of senior financial scams in reality are far more serious than stolen savings. When many seniors live in social isolation, struggle with illness and depression, and largely blame themselves for the actions of predators, we’re talking about a problem that is truly life-threatening.

And the problem is far from uniquely American.  Seniors all over the world are falling prey to scam calls and wire transfer scams.  In Japan, several seniors have killed themselves after being victimized by a scammer.

It is important to remember, both as a potential victim or someone who may one day witness someone get taken in by a scammer, that it is NEVER a victim’s fault when someone lies and steals from them. The ONLY one who has to answer for exploitation is the exploiter.

It is not your fault.

While reporting and regaining what was stolen may seem paramount, your first and immediate priority should always be assuring the health of the affected.  Senior scams leave victims feeling embarrassed, alone, unsafe, unstable, and guilty.

If you or someone you love is taken advantage of by a senior scammer, please consider counseling, visiting a primary care physician, or locating a senior support group in your area. Get to know the warning signs of suicide and depression, and take immediate treatment action if you recognize them.

If you are in immediate distress and need emotional support, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK(8255) or visit https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org to chat with trained staff who CAN help you.

Common tech support scams exploit users’ inexperience to gain access to their devices and their credit cards

Imagine you’re surfing the web looking for an entertaining video to watch while you’re waiting for the kettle to whistle or a phone call or maybe to flip your laundry over to the dryer.

You pull up your browser and type in YouTube’s URL.

Suddenly, instead of the homepage you’re expecting, your browser loads a bright blue screen that says “your computer is infected—call Microsoft tech support immediately at this toll-free number.”  It may even say that if you don’t call within a certain amount of time, your hard drive will be destroyed.  Maybe there’s a pop-up window directing you to contact tech support complete with the Windows and Microsoft logos.

This is the gateway to a classic tech support scam.  And it starts as soon as you dial the number listed on your warning screen.

But for as threatening as that warning is what you’re looking at is simply a web page like any other.

In panic, many users don’t think to look at the address bar to notice they’ve accidentally mistyped www.youtube.com, leading them to a page created to catch traffic from millions of users flocking to a popular site and typing the URL incorrectly.

Your computer isn’t infected.  You can navigate away from the page at any time.

But many users, fearing they could lose their (likely not-backed-up) data in the next five minutes, fall for the trap and call the number.

There are many different flavors of the tech support scam, but the goal is usually to get remote access to your computer, fabricate evidence of a critical issue, and eventually get you to hand over your credit card number in exchange for “fixing” the problem.

Here is a great walkthrough of how a typical tech support scam works (warning: this video contains some profanity):

If you’re lucky, the scammer will only charge your card for the value of the “protection plan” they discussed with you prior to payment.  If not, the scammer could charge your card for any amount, sell your card number to other scammers online, steal bank and personal information from your computer, or irreparably destroy your entire machine out of sheer maliciousness.

A particularly angering feature of this scam is how much it relies on a user’s unfamiliarity with their own systems to function.  The “evidence” the scammer presents to prove the need for purchasing his “tech support services” is pure nonsense—he’s merely walking the user through a series of normal command prompts and system processes a very casual computer user might not recognize, totally lying to the user about what they’re looking at to scare them.

Though seniors aren’t the only targets of this scam (more Millennials fall prey to tech support scams than any other age group), they do tend to lose far more money overall to tech support scammers.  For many, the financial damages are devastating.  One large loss like this can completely change a retiree’s life.

Stay skeptical about warning pop-ups and sites you may come across while surfing.  Always check the URL in the address bar to make sure you’ve navigated to the correct place, and always click the back button, try navigating to another page, or try closing and reopening your browser before you panic—just because your browser may say your computer is locked doesn’t mean it is.

Never call a random tech support number some web page or pop-up gave you unsolicited.  If you suspect your computer has been infected with malware, the best thing to do is call a reputable local professional.

To put yourself at ease, consider investing in a good antivirus program so you can regularly scan your computer yourself for any unwanted activity.

EMPLOYEES AT MICROSOFT, DELL, SYMANTEC, MCAFEE, HEWLETT-PACKARD, OR APPLE WILL NEVER CONTACT YOU TO ALERT YOU ABOUT COMPUTER PROBLEMS. Many of these tech scammers and their pages will try to tell you they’re from Microsoft or some other reputable software company.  They’re not. These companies do not keep track of your devices’ health and will not contact like this you to warn you about problems.  Anyone telling you that is lying.  The only thing that will monitor your device and alert you in the event of infection is your firewall and your antivirus software.

With a fairly basic knowledge of their computer’s operating system, many victims of this scam may have been able to recognize some extremely obvious falsehoods the scammer probably told while trying to show “evidence” of an infection.  If you aren’t totally confident in your computer literacy, taking a few computing classes could go a long way in protecting you from these scammers. Check your local senior center, community college, or check out one of the many online computer courses available for seniors.

 

AND PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE BACK UP YOUR DATA REGULARLY.

Senators Moran and Casey introduce Senior Scams Prevention Act to prevent the most common forms of senior financial abuse

On September 27, Ranking Member of the U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging Senator Bob Casey (D-PA) and Chairman of the Senate Committee on Commerce Subcommittee on Consumer Protection Senator Jerry Moran (R-KS) introduced S.3522, a bipartisan bill aimed at training financial establishments to stop senior scams.

S.3522, known as the Senior Scams Prevention Act, would create an advisory council at the federal level to develop and distribute information and training materials to the very banks and retailers most scammers use to conduct their crimes.

“Now more than ever, it is imperative we bring industry leaders together to examine ways and propose actions American businesses can take to help educate the public, specifically senior citizens, on how to identify and avoid these harmful scams,” Senator Moran explained in an October 1 press release.

S.3522 operates under the oft-uttered advice that the best way to protect yourself from fraud is to recognize and prevent the fraud before it happens.  In many cases, stopping the theft before it happens may be a victim’s only relief given the ways scammers most frequently extract money from their targets.

Among the vocal supporters of this legislation are Green Dot Corp., MoneyGram, and Western Union, prepaid debit card and wire transfer companies scammers love to use to keep their transactions with victims anonymous and irreversible.  Transactions made with gift cards, prepaid debit cards, and wire transfers are as good as dealing with cash—once the scammer has the number from the card or picks up the wire transfer at the pick-up location, the victim can’t ever get his money back.

In these situations, it behooves both potential victims and companies used to commit fraud to notice the red flags before the transaction is completed.  Catching these criminals is next to impossible after the money ends up in their hands.

And victims of scammers aren’t the only ones who lose.  In 2017, the Federal Trade Commission and the Department of Justice required Western Union to pay $586 million to victims of wire transfer scams using their services.

Not only will intensive education on blocking senior scams prevent millions of Americans from becoming victims, but it will save companies millions of dollars in investigations, refunds, and settlements.

Though these measures will benefit all Americans in the long run, S.3522 is specifically focused on protecting the most targeted and vulnerable population when it comes to scams: senior citizens.

“Far too many older Americans have been targeted by scam artists. These criminals threaten legal action against seniors or loved ones if ‘payment’ is not made immediately through a wire transfer or gift card,” said Senator Casey. “The Senior Scams Prevention Act would help stop a payment before it is ever made so that seniors don’t lose one more penny to a fraud or scam.”

John Oliver: Guardianship Gone Bad

The Seniors Center has written extensively about Guardianship-for-Profit.  For More Information, read:

Senior Citizens Victimized By Guardianship-for-Profit

Famed New York socialite and philanthropist, Brooke Astor, robbed of millions in America’s most high-profile guardianship abuse case

Isolate, medicate, liquidate: senior “guardians” make millions by keeping seniors in a virtual prison

Court-Appointed “Guardians” Put Seniors In Assisted Living, Take Over Assets

Senior Citizens Victimized By Guardianship-for-Profit

In November 2009, my then very independent 88-year-old mother who lived alone in a suburb in another state 1000 miles away, called and said she needed me. I flew there immediately. Two days later, she fell and broke her hip and clavicle. She spent days in the hospital and weeks at a rehab facility. My sister joined us. We talked to her family doctor and it became clear that Mom couldn’t live alone anymore, shouldn’t be driving, and had early signs of dementia. She had been managing because she had lived there for so long, her family doctor said she was on “auto pilot.”

Older couple

Getting Older Can Mean Needing Someone To Take Care Of You. Make Sure It’s Someone You Know.

Because she had a Durable Power of Attorney, Health Care Surrogate Designation, Living Will and HIPAA Release, we contacted her attorney to activate them so we could take care of her healthcare needs and finances. We decided to move her to an assisted living facility near my sister’s house, and I soon moved close by. She is 97 now, in a memory care unit and uses a wheelchair but is in good health for her age.

I can only imagine if this had happened and she hadn’t planned on how she wanted us to deal with a situation like this. Anyone who observed her on a more regular basis might have seen that she was in the early state of dementia and taken advantage of the situation by trying to obtain guardianship and wiping her out.

The Seniors Center began exposing the Guardianship-for-Profit Business in February, shortly after The New Yorker published an article about senior citizens whose lives were devastated by for-profit “guardians.”  In April, the Senate Special Committee on Aging held hearings on Guardianship Abuse.

 

What is Guardianship?

Guardianship is where someone petitions the court, alleges that a person is “incapacitated”, or incapable of taking care of himself, and asks the court to appoint him or a third party to take care of the incapacitated person (ward’s) medical and financial affairs. Usually equity or probate courts, which operate under very different rules from criminal courts, oversee this process. There are no fixed definitions of what constitutes “incapacity”, which varies from state to state and can be determined by people who may not be physicians, or committees who collude with each other to come up with a report.

According to Dr. Sam Sugar, author of “Guardianships and the Elderly – The Perfect Crime”, nine common scenarios trigger taking elderly people into guardianships:

  1. A dispute in the family over taking care of an elderly parent or fear that a sibling or child may have undue influence and try to steal from the parent
  2. Concern for the dissipation of a parent’s money by a new person in his/her life
  3. A weapon by an angry spouse
  4. A family’s honest attempt to get help for a loved one
  5. A non-family member recognizing the need for assistance
  6. Intervention of financial institutions who call Adult Financial Protection institutions because of suspected fraud
  7. Intervention of medical institutions who see vulnerability or abuse
  8. Family members fearing the loss of their inheritance
  9. Law enforcement intervention, especially for drug and alcohol abuse.

Richard Black, director of Americans Against Probate Guardianship, tells the story of his father-in-law, Del Mencarelli, who was a victim of a longtime family friend. The friend defrauded his father-in-law out of $1 million and cost Black’s family $400,000 to gain control of Mencarelli and his estate, but in the middle of the court battle, Mencarelli died of neglect. According to Black, families spend an average of 4500,000 fighting these guardianships.

Spider-Man creator Stan Lee, a 95-year-old widower who had a $50+ million estate, was a victim of financial abuse. An LA Court had to issue a temporary restraining order against a man who claimed to be Lee’s caregiver. You can read about other examples here: https://stopguardianabuse.org/victims/

Courts are supposed to monitor guardianships and grant them only to non-family members if there is no family member available to take care of the elderly person, but things don’t always happen that way. In 43% of the cases, guardians failed to meet all court-mandated reporting obligations, including obtaining bonds, filing an inventory of assets in the estate or annual accounting of transactions. According to a recent article in Reuters and the National Association to Stop Guardianship Abuse, “the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) identified hundreds of abuse, neglect, and exploitation by guardians in 45 states and the District of Columbia between 1990 and 2010. The GAO reviewed 20 cases and found that guardians had stolen or otherwise improperly obtained $5.4 million from 158 incapacitated victims, mostly older adults.”

Older couple with conman

People are getting rich by getting older Americans declared incompetent.

An abusive industry has even arisen where professional, for-profit guardians are appointed by courts, which gives them absolute control over someone’s rights, including living conditions and healthcare. Guardians can transfer the elder’s financial assets, estate, and personal property even if they are in a trust, into their own names. They can limit family members from speaking to or seeing their “wards”. They can charge the estate an hourly rate to grocery shop, make phone calls, open mail or arrange family visits. The judges and lawyers who oversee this process also profit from it and are susceptible to corruption, biases and influence. If the ward dies, guardians can run up huge fees by presenting bills for services, pushing papers and filing motions.

What is Being Done to Fix This?

On April 18, 2018, the Senate Aging Committee recommended enacting state laws to provide less restrictive arrangements than guardianship, such as assisted decision making, for seniors and others with disabilities, requiring telling the individual under care and family members that a guardian has been appointed, what the guardian’s responsibilities are and how to report guardian abuse, and mandating guardians tell the courts when people under their care have become able again to make their own decisions.

Individual states and municipalities are acting to protect elderly people from abuse, including financial and guardianship abuse, with task forces, elder courts, elder justice centers, and training members of the judicial system on elder abuse. In 2010, 10 National Guardianship Network (NGN) networks met at the Third National Guardianship Summit and one of the recommendations called for Working Interdisciplinary Networks of Guardianship Stakeholders (WINGS) to implement the summit recommendations.

 What Can You Do to Protect Your Loved One from Guardianship Abuse?

Have a family meeting to discuss how to best protect your loved ones. If they don’t have financial and healthcare powers of attorney, consult an attorney to draft the documents. It is recommended that several people in the family be granted powers of attorney to ensure that if your loved ones become incapacitated, the person(s) they designate can make decisions for them. Keep on top of things and intervene early, because even if elders have advanced directives, wills, durable powers of attorney or trusts, if someone obtains guardianship over them, it can nullify them.

Monitor who your elders are talking to or who is helping them, especially if you do not live nearby. Unsuspecting, lonely elders who may be in frail health may let neighbors, service providers, caregivers or even complete strangers take advantage of them. If they live alone, make daily check-in calls and ask neighbors or friends to check on them. If they suddenly acquire new “friends”, check them out. If a family member is suddenly spending a lot of time with your elderly relative, find out what is going on. It may be someone with a substance abuse or financial problem looking for an easy mark. If this happens, the elder either might not realize what is going on, or report a problem out of embarrassment or fear. Only 1 in 44 cases of elder financial fraud are reported. If you suspect that it is happening to a loved one, report it to the authorities.

PHOTO CREDIT FOR THE FIRST PHOTO: lauramusikanski @ morguefile.com

Protect Yourself From Fraud, Scams & Cons

I struggle to keep up with technology. It seems like I was just getting into Facebook when people started talking about Twitter.  And by the time I figured out what Twitter was all about, my kids were talking about Snapchat.

Modern technology is doing a lot to make our lives so much better.  Who could have imagined a few years ago that I’d be able to type something right here at my kitchen counter and that a few minutes later, you’d be able to read it?

Sadly all of this new technology makes it a lot easier for conmen, thieves, and scammers to get ahold of our hard earned cash. Watch the video above to hear about one of the latest scams targeting older people.

Cases of fraud, scams, cons are on the rise.   Technological inventions and advancements are giving thieves and conmen new ways of getting people to part with our hard-earned money. Money can be wired electronically and so it is easy for thieves, fraudsters and conmen to pose as legit people whom you should make out a payment to. It is even sad that these people whose main aim is to take what does not belong to them, target the elderly people in the community. This is mostly because they so many older people are vulnerable, lonely, insecure and sometimes unfamiliar with new technologies.

That is why The Seniors Center created this blog: to search for constructive solutions to the most critical issues facing America’s senior citizens. Through TheSeniorsCenter.blog, we offer educational programs about scams, frauds, and cons targeting senior citizens —  and the best ways to avoid becoming victims.

How to Prevent elder Fraud

There are a number if ways in which older people can avoid falling into the hands of fraudsters, conmen and thieves.

  1. Avoid giving out Information or money based on an email.

Phishing emails is a common thing where someone sends emails randomly and those that reply back become victims of fraud, or scams. They draft messages and disguise them to look like they are from a genuine site. They then demand to be paid money maybe as a bill or for some other use. Before sending money to anyone just confirm the information received on mail with a phone call or any other form of communication for authenticity.

  1. If possible seek the services of a trusted Financial advisor

As we age, our memory suffers and new technologies come forth. This definitely affects our financial decisions and most fraudsters count on that for their plans to succeed. That way if you need to make an unauthenticated payment, the financial advisor can easily check out for the red flags. Take it as a double security check to protect you.

  1. Always authenticate information received on phone before sending money

Unless it is someone you know and trust, you should always countercheck and ensure that the person on phone is who they say they are.

  1. Prepare necessary legal documents in advance

Some of the most important documents include power of attorney, which appoints someone or some people who will act on your behalf when need arises. It will be hard for any fraudster, conman or even thief to successfully get his way through these people as appointed by you.

Wrap Up

While only 35 percent of American population is over 50, 57% of all fraud is fraud victims are 50 or older. This shows that older Americans are the most vulnerable hence targeted by fraudsters, creating awareness is the best way of combating this statistic.